Natasha Naidoo

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Personalised medicine and medical malpractice

Personalised medicine involves the consideration of health risk factors and genetic information to determine individual risk profiles. This customisation of healthcare uses medical decisions, practices, treatments, and products that are tailor-made to an individual’s requirements, and is based on hereditary profile. This could result in quicker diagnosis and a more targeted form of treatment for … Continue reading

Think twice before rejecting a Calderbank offer

In May 2019 the Bloemfontein High Court confirmed that a secret offer which is made by any party to a damages claim (including the plaintiff) to save costs will affect the costs order.  Such an offer is known as a Calderbank offer with origins in English law and similar principles apply in the South African … Continue reading

What’s on the horizon for the insurance industry in 2019?

Our lawyers across ten jurisdictions have created a guide detailing the top legal concerns for insurers from various regions. Some developments are concerns only in a specific market while other topics appear to be common across several jurisdictions. Increasing focus on personal accountability, greater oversight of distribution chains and the protection of customer interests and … Continue reading

Personalised medicine: Implications for the insurance industry and for consumers

Personalised medicine is set to revolutionise the manner in which patients are diagnosed and treated. It involves genetic testing and a consideration of an individual’s health risk factors and genetic information and tailoring medical treatment accordingly. Such testing could lead to quicker diagnosis and treatment, but it does not come cheaply. It is unclear whether … Continue reading

The effect of legalisation of cannabis on the insurance industry

The legalization of private cultivation, possession and the use of cannabis in South Africa has had the effect of changing the law which will undoubtedly require transformation in the insurance industry. The Constitutional Court in Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development and Others v Prince (and others) has given Parliament 24 months to amend current … Continue reading
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