Patrick Bracher (ZA)

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Covid-19 claim rejected because of virus exception (US)

A Kentucky US district court rejected the business interruption insurance claim of a retail business specialising in sale of outdoor sportswear and equipment for losses suffered as a result of government restrictions following the outbreak of Covid-19. The all-risks policy covered physical loss and damage but excluded damage caused directly or indirectly regardless of any … Continue reading

More debarment guidance from the Tribunal

More debarment guidance from the Tribunal A representative’s dishonesty, negligence or incompetence must be sufficiently serious to impugn the honesty and integrity of the representative as a person before debarment is justified. The ambit of the enquiry determining fit and proper characteristics is that a representative must conduct themselves with honesty and integrity and be … Continue reading

Subrogated claim against fire-causing students rejected because students were insureds (US)

The insurer was denied the right to sue two former college students for $4.5 million the insurer had paid to the school after the students accidentally set fire to the dormitory.  It was held that the students accommodated in dormitories were equivalent to tenants and insured under the school’s fire policy. The two students used a … Continue reading

124 food poisoning claims is one ‘occurrence’ (US)

A Texas district court held that 124 claims for food poisoning from salmonella bacteria suffered by patrons at a restaurant was one ‘occurrence’ within the terms of the restaurant’s insurance policy. An occurrence was defined as ‘an accident including continuous or repeated exposure to the same general harmful conditions’. An occurrence was ‘an accident’ and … Continue reading

Claim for loss of use of building precluded by ‘impaired property’ exclusion (US)

A conveyor company failed in its claim against its insurers for a loss arising from the supply of a defective cookie packaging machine to a biscuit manufacturer because the policy specifically excluded coverage for “impaired property”.  The claim by the biscuit manufacturer against the insured alleged that they were unable to use their new building … Continue reading

Legal professional privilege promotes the rule of law

In a matter regarding unlawful surveillance the Constitutional Court held that the proper functioning of our legal system is reliant on the confidentiality of communications between lawyer and client. That promotes the rule of law. Although originally sourced from the common law, legal professional privilege is now supported by the Constitution. The court reaffirmed a … Continue reading

Protection of journalists’ sources is supported by the Constitution

In the course of a judgment regarding unlawful surveillance, the Constitutional Court found that journalists’ sources of information require special consideration and must be protected against disclosure to the extent possible. Journalists are not expected to reveal the identity of their sources. Freedom of the media is a fundamental requirement for democracy and when journalists … Continue reading

International law does not cover expropriations of property belonging to a country’s own nationals

An interesting case involving international law was heard in the US Supreme Court and lead to the conclusion that the US Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act which reflects international law does not entitle a foreign state to interfere with what is known as a ‘domestic taking’ where the state takes the property of its own nationals. … Continue reading

New York regulator issues a cyber-insurance risk framework

Concerned about pandemic-related extra cyber activity, the rise in ransomware and recent cyber-espionage campaigns, the New York State Department of Financial Services (DFS) issued a cyber-insurance risk framework on 4 February 2021. After describing the risks for insurers and concluding that insurers play a critical role in mitigating and reducing the risks of cyber-crime, the … Continue reading

Meaning of payment for electricity under lease at ‘prevailing commercial rates’ (UK)

Where a tenant was required to pay for electricity and gas ‘at no more than … the … prevailing commercial rates’ the court held that this meant the prevailing commercial rates of the private utility networks of major UK airports including airports receiving international and internal passengers rather than the rates payable to public networks … Continue reading

Merger ends due to failure to operate in the ordinary course, but COVID-19 not MAE (US)

In December 2020 the Delaware court held that the COVID-19 pandemic did not cause a Material Adverse Effect on the target of a merger because the MAE excluded ‘natural disasters and calamities’. Despite this, the buyer was not obliged to close the transaction and was entitled to terminate the sale agreement because the target made … Continue reading

No liability for cricket ball injury

Anyone who has studied the law of delict since 1951 is aware of the English case of Bolton v Stone which found that hitting a cricket ball out of a cricket ground is an incidence of the game and did not amount to negligence so that the passer-by injured by the ball could not sue … Continue reading

Nasdaq proposes board diversity for listed companies

Nasdaq has proposed board diversity requirements as a condition to continued listing of corporations. The proposal adopts a ‘comply or disclose’ approach to encourage greater diversity on company boards requiring them to have at least one director who self-identifies as female and have one director who self-identifies as black or African American, Hispanic or Latinx, … Continue reading
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