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Hospitality guest indemnity upheld under Consumer Protection Act

Author: James Donald, Candidate Attorney In an April 2021 judgement, the Eastern Cape high court held that a standard form guest indemnity used by a game reserve was not in conflict with applicable provisions in the Consumer Protection Act 2008 (the CPA). The plaintiff was a tourist to South Africa, on holiday at a local … Continue reading

Competition law requirements when doing mergers in Africa: 10 Things to know

There have been a number of important developments in competition law across Africa over the past few years. An increasing number of African countries have implemented merger notification regimes. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Firms that wish to acquire businesses or expand their operations in Africa should be mindful that their transactions may require approval from regulator/s in the country/ies … Continue reading

Business interruption claims and physical damage

There has been a plethora of Covid-19 policy coverage litigation across the United States.  Absent non-damage extensions under business interruption policies the courts have had to consider whether amongst other things government restrictions on businesses including shutdown orders constituted interruption of business caused by loss to property insured.  That included whether those restrictions on businesses … Continue reading

Broad-based ownership structures: Do they count?

This blog was co-authored by Hishaam Khan, Candidate Attorney The Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition has recently clarified the confusion on whether Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) trusts should be recognised as B-BBEE owners in B-BBEE structures for the purposes of the B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice.  In the Practice Note published during May … Continue reading

Setting aside a settlement agreement due to common mistake

This blog was co-authored by Tristan Marot, Candidate Attorney. The Labour Appeal Court has recently restated the law on common mistake as it applies to having a settlement agreement set aside in Murray and Roberts (Pty) Ltd v The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration & Others. The matter stemmed from a dispute between the … Continue reading

Repudiating a contract – again

In its June 2021 judgement, the Constitutional Court restated the principles relevant to repudiation of a contract. A party commits the breach of repudiation when through words or conduct that party manifests an unequivocal intention to no longer be bound by the contract or by material obligations forming part of the contract. The intention to … Continue reading

Interpreting contracts and contextual evidence

The Constitutional Court has reaffirmed that that approach to interpretation of contracts requires that from the outset one considers the context and the language together with neither predominating over the other. The approach to interpretation is a unitary exercise.  Interpretation is to be approached holistically, simultaneously considering the text, content and purpose. Context and purpose must … Continue reading

Judges changing their minds

A Google search will produce a long list of quotations affirming the right to change one’s mind. When a judge gives a decision contradicting one of their earlier judgments that becomes more difficult. Judges have a way of finessing a reversal of opinions which they may have expressed in an earlier judgment. Two of the … Continue reading

COVID-19 Vaccines: A step towards mandatory vaccination in the workplace

Whilst Government had initially taken the view that vaccinations against COVID-19 would not be made mandatory, the revised Consolidated Directions on Occupational Health and Safety Measures in certain workplaces (the Directions), promulgated by the Minister of Employment and Labour, on 11 June 2021, reflect a significant change of approach. In particular the Directions now implicitly permit, … Continue reading

SCA gives clarity on the meaning of conflict of interest for business rescue practitioners

SCA gives clarity on the meaning of conflict of interest for business rescue practitioners In February 2018, eight companies in the Oakbay Group were placed in voluntary business rescue. Amongst these companies were the first respondent, Tegeta Exploration and Resources (Pty) Ltd, and its three subsidiaries, Optimum Coal Mine (Pty) Ltd (OCM), Koornfontein Mines (Pty) … Continue reading

Certifying documents as copies of the original without seeing the originals is dishonest

The facts in a Financial Services Tribunal debarment matter were that the financial services’ representative had certified certain documents as copies of the original without having seen the original documents.  She failed to ensure that she complied with the statutory requirements for certifying copies and the duties made mandatory upon her through her position as … Continue reading

A Constitutionally invalid agreement is void from inception and does not confer any rights under the contract

A Constitutionally invalid agreement is void from inception and does not confer any rights under the contract The dispute concerned a lease for a hotel in Coffee Bay, Transkei for a period of 20 years that was held to be constitutionally invalid because the lease had been signed contrary to the laws relating to public … Continue reading

Powers of the Financial Services Tribunal

Industry role players who have found themselves subject to regulatory action taken by the Prudential Authority (PA) or the Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA) may apply to the Financial Service Tribunal (FST) for reconsideration of that action.  Reasons for the decision can be requested within 30 days and the application must be made within 30 … Continue reading

“Reasonable prior notice” discussed (UK)

A UK admiralty court held that 12 hours’ notice of a change of tariff for berthing charges and other services in a port for a vessel that had been delayed by the Covid-19 pandemic was not reasonable notice.  The regulation required “reasonable prior notice”. The requirement of reasonable prior notice was not complied with because … Continue reading

English law and exclusive jurisdiction clauses

In a claim between reinsurers and a South African banking group, the English High Court, in an application that was not opposed by the South African party, granted an anti-suit injunction preventing the proceedings taking place in South Africa for various reasons including that the English law exclusive jurisdiction clause was binding. English legislation allows … Continue reading
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